The Humane League
Organization

Far from being “humane” to people it disagrees with, The Humane League has a history of unlawful activity conducted in the name of animal rights. If you go The Humane League’s website, you’ll likely see a cute picture of an animal or two. But if you look closely, you’ll also see the “fine print”: A public notice relating to several restraining orders against The Humane League:

Legal

“Notice: The Court of Common Pleas of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, has issued an order prohibiting certain activity relating to GlaxoSmithKline, and persons or entities having business or economic relatins with GlaxoSmithKline”

NOTICE: Temporary Emergency Ex-Parte Restraining Order issued in regards to the London Grill Restaurant. Check it out by clicking here.

NOTICE: THE SUPERIOUR COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW JERSEY HAS ISSUED AN ORDER PROHIBITING CERTAIN ACTIVITIES RELATING TO PLAINTIFF ROTENBERG MERIL SOLOMON BERTIGER & GUTTILLA, P.C., THEIR CURRENT OR FORMER EMPLOYEES AND THEIR FAMILIES OR ANY PERSONS KNOWN OR BELIEVED TO BE FAMILY MEMBERS, THEIR CLIENTS, THEIR VENDORS, THEIR AFFILIATES, AND THEIR BUSINESS ASSOCIATES.

Notice: The Superior Court of the State of New Jersey has issued an order prohibiting certain activity relating to Huntingdon Life Sciences, Inc. and Life Sciences Research, Inc., and any persons or entities having business or economic relations with Huntingdon Life Sciences, Inc. or Life Sciences Research, Inc.

Now with satellite groups in Baltimore, Dallas, Charlotte, and Boston, The Humane League started its ignominious history in Philadelphia. The Humane League of Philadelphia was previously called Hugs for Puppies—a laughable misnomer—and Hugs for Puppies used rather extreme tactics.  The third restraining order listed barred Hugs for Puppies from demonstrating, approaching, calling or e-mailing the employees of an accounting firm that merely did business with a company that performed research on animals. (Targeting employees of tangential companies has been a tactic employed by radical animal rights activists.) Another restraining order was extended after a court heard testimony that protestors called owners at a restaurant serving foie gras “duck rapists” and shouted that they knew where an owner “sleeps at night.”

So for much for being “humane” in the City of Brotherly Love.

In 2006, Nick Cooney, founder and current board member of The Humane League, was convicted of making terroristic threats, harassment, and criminal conspiracy. According to media reports and court documents, he threatened to kill the children of an employee of a drug company. An appellate court, in upholding an injunction against Cooney, determined that “Cooney’s purpose in publishing…employees’ personal information was to threaten – to intimidate the individuals and alienate them from their neighbors, friends, and family.”